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https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/templates/general_wide/img/logo.png UKDFD Recording Software https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/ Toys and miniatures https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/post-medieval-to-modern/toys-and-miniatures.html Lead Toy https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/post-medieval-to-modern/toys-and-miniatures/lead-toy-54324.html Tue, 19 Mar 2019 15:53:56 GMT Toys and miniatures Lead Toy  
Description: A complete lead toy in the form of a pig. Probably from the Britains Home Farm Series which was introduced in 1921.
Category: Post-Medieval to Modern, Toys and miniatures
Category: Toys and miniatures
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Buzz Disc or ’Whirligig’ https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/post-medieval-to-modern/toys-and-miniatures/buzz-disc-or-whirligig-22135.html Thu, 12 Nov 2009 00:00:00 GMT Toys and miniatures Buzz Disc or ’Whirligig’  
Description: A crude musical toy known as a 'buzz disc' or 'whirligig', possibly improvised from an unrelated object. It consists of a lead disc with a saw-tooth edge and two piercings. When attached to a cord, which is twisted and then pulled taut between two hands, the spinning of the disc produces a rhythmic humming (amplified by the toothed edges), which rises and falls with each pull of the cord. Such toys have also been home-made from buttons, and more recently - for safety reasons - from cardboard. The latter type were given as a free gift in comics as late as the 1950s-60s. With coloured panels printed on the cardboard, the spinning produced a visual, as well as audible, toy.

Whirligigs have their origin in ancient times, when pig metacarpals and metatarsals were drilled and threaded to serve the same purpose. They have been found in Saxon to early post-medieval deposits in Britain. Lead examples of the present type have been found in late medieval to post-medieval deposits during surveys of the Thames foreshore in the City of London.

The following extract is from a Historical Toy Website
"Whirling toys made of hammered lead musket balls or coins too old or thin to be of value have been excavated from early American towns, plantations, and military campsites. The sound of the whirling disk lends this folk toy its common name of ’buzzer’, although it appears in English literature as early as 1686 under the general name for spinning toys, whirligig. The scalloped edge of our buzzer identifies it more particularly as a ’buzz saw’ toy. In past times the edge was often sharply cut into a sawtooth pattern, but a buzz saw with any shaped edge will produce an impressive loud, whizzing noise when it reaches full speed."
Category: Post-Medieval to Modern, Toys and miniatures
Category: Toys and miniatures
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Buzz Disc or 'Whirligig' https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/post-medieval-to-modern/toys-and-miniatures/buzz-disc-or-whirligig-29674.html Tue, 08 Feb 2011 00:00:00 GMT Toys and miniatures Buzz Disc or 'Whirligig'  
Description: An incomplete lead 'buzz disc' or 'whirligig'. A crude musical toy known as a 'buzz disc' or 'whirligig', possibly improvised from an unrelated object. It consists of a lead disc with a saw-tooth edge and two piercings. When attached to a cord, which is twisted and then pulled taut between two hands, the spinning of the disc produces a rhythmic humming (amplified by the toothed edges), which rises and falls with each pull of the cord. Such toys have also been home-made from buttons, and more recently - for safety reasons - from cardboard. The latter type were given as a free gift in comics as late as the 1950s-60s. With coloured panels printed on the cardboard, the spinning produced a visual, as well as audible, toy.

Whirligigs have their origin in ancient times, when pig metacarpals and metatarsals were drilled and threaded to serve the same purpose. They have been found in Saxon to early post-medieval deposits in Britain. Lead examples of the present type have been found in late medieval to post-medieval deposits during surveys of the Thames foreshore in the City of London.
Category: Post-Medieval to Modern, Toys and miniatures
Category: Toys and miniatures
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Buzz Disc or 'Whirligig' https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/post-medieval-to-modern/toys-and-miniatures/buzz-disc-or-whirligig-43723.html Sun, 17 Nov 2013 00:00:00 GMT Toys and miniatures Buzz Disc or 'Whirligig'  
Description: A crude musical toy known as a 'buzz disc' or 'whirligig', possibly improvised from an unrelated object. It consists of a lead disc with a saw-tooth edge and four piercings. When attached to a cord, which is twisted and then pulled taut between two hands, the spinning of the disc produces a rhythmic humming (amplified by the toothed edges), which rises and falls with each pull of the cord. Such toys have also been home-made from buttons, and more recently - for safety reasons - from cardboard. The latter type were given as a free gift in comics as late as the 1950s-60s. With coloured panels printed on the cardboard, the spinning produced a visual, as well as audible, toy.

Whirligigs have their origin in ancient times, when pig metacarpals and metatarsals were drilled and threaded to serve the same purpose. They have been found in Saxon to early post-medieval deposits in Britain. Lead examples of the present type have been found in late medieval to post-medieval deposits during surveys of the Thames foreshore in the City of London.

The following extract is from a Historical Toy Website:
"Whirling toys made of hammered lead musket balls or coins too old or thin to be of value have been excavated from early American towns, plantations, and military campsites. The sound of the whirling disk lends this folk toy its common name of ’buzzer’, although it appears in English literature as early as 1686 under the general name for spinning toys, whirligig. The scalloped edge of our buzzer identifies it more particularly as a ’buzz saw’ toy. In past times the edge was often sharply cut into a sawtooth pattern, but a buzz saw with any shaped edge will produce an impressive loud, whizzing noise when it reaches full speed."
Category: Post-Medieval to Modern, Toys and miniatures
Category: Toys and miniatures
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Buzz Disc or 'Whirligig' https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/post-medieval-to-modern/toys-and-miniatures/buzz-disc-or-whirligig-51255.html Tue, 26 Jul 2016 00:00:00 GMT Toys and miniatures Buzz Disc or 'Whirligig'  
Description: A crude musical toy known as a 'buzz disc' or 'whirligig', possibly improvised from an unrelated object. It consists of a lead disc with a saw-tooth edge and five piercings. When attached to a cord, which is twisted and then pulled taut between two hands, the spinning of the disc produces a rhythmic humming (amplified by the toothed edges), which rises and falls with each pull of the cord. Such toys have also been home-made from buttons, and more recently - for safety reasons - from cardboard. The latter type were given as a free gift in comics as late as the 1950s-60s. With coloured panels printed on the cardboard, the spinning produced a visual, as well as audible, toy.

Whirligigs have their origin in ancient times, when pig metacarpals and metatarsals were drilled and threaded to serve the same purpose. They have been found in Saxon to early post-medieval deposits in Britain. Lead examples of the present type have been found in late medieval to post-medieval deposits during surveys of the Thames foreshore in the City of London.

The following extract is from a Historical Toy Website:
"Whirling toys made of hammered lead musket balls or coins too old or thin to be of value have been excavated from early American towns, plantations, and military campsites. The sound of the whirling disk lends this folk toy its common name of ’buzzer’, although it appears in English literature as early as 1686 under the general name for spinning toys, whirligig. The scalloped edge of our buzzer identifies it more particularly as a ’buzz saw’ toy. In past times the edge was often sharply cut into a sawtooth pattern, but a buzz saw with any shaped edge will produce an impressive loud, whizzing noise when it reaches full speed."
Category: Post-Medieval to Modern, Toys and miniatures
Category: Toys and miniatures
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Toy Cannon https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/post-medieval-to-modern/toys-and-miniatures/toy-cannon-529.html Tue, 20 Sep 2005 00:00:00 GMT Toys and miniatures Toy Cannon  
Description: Toy cannon complete with integral trunnions. The shape is unusually stubby and mortar-like. Although playthings, cannon of this type were designed to be fired, and were potentially quite dangerous. They used a small charge of gunpowder and were loaded with a suitably sized lead or stone projectile.
Category: Post-Medieval to Modern, Toys and miniatures
Category: Toys and miniatures
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Toy Musket https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/post-medieval-to-modern/toys-and-miniatures/toy-musket-2969.html Tue, 11 Apr 2006 00:00:00 GMT Toys and miniatures Toy Musket  
Description: A toy musket of the 17th century. The butt and trigger guard are missing; the side not illustrated is flat and plain.
Category: Post-Medieval to Modern, Toys and miniatures
Category: Toys and miniatures
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Miniature Cauldron https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/post-medieval-to-modern/toys-and-miniatures/miniature-cauldron-9970.html Fri, 02 Nov 2007 00:00:00 GMT Toys and miniatures Miniature Cauldron  
Description: A miniature copper-alloy cauldron with flared rim, two diametrically opposed loop handles, a globular body with sagging base and circular-section legs.

Cf. PAS: SWYOR-DC2427
Category: Post-Medieval to Modern, Toys and miniatures
Category: Toys and miniatures
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Toy Watch https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/post-medieval-to-modern/toys-and-miniatures/toy-watch-11387.html Fri, 18 Jan 2008 00:00:00 GMT Toys and miniatures Toy Watch  
Description: One side of a double sided toy watch. The watch face has a chapter ring with twelve hours denoted by Roman numerals. The time appears to be set at six o'clock. Within a thickened outer edge and an inner concentric circle, is a band of rococo scroll decoration.

A similar example is recorded on the PAS database: SUR-0C43B1
Category: Post-Medieval to Modern, Toys and miniatures
Category: Toys and miniatures
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Miniature Jug https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/post-medieval-to-modern/toys-and-miniatures/miniature-jug-17833.html Wed, 04 Mar 2009 00:00:00 GMT Toys and miniatures Miniature Jug  
Description: A incomplete post medieval pewter toy jug or mug. The body of the bowl forms a cup-shape with a inverted saucer-shape base. The remnant of a single handle remains and a mark on the rim of the foot indicates where it terminated.
Category: Post-Medieval to Modern, Toys and miniatures
Category: Toys and miniatures
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