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https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/templates/general_wide/img/logo.png UKDFD Recording Software https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/ Seal boxes https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/roman/seal-boxes.html Seal-Box Lid https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/roman/seal-boxes/seal-box-lid-54585.html Wed, 04 Sep 2019 17:50:03 GMT Seal boxes Seal-Box Lid  
Description: A copper-alloy seal-box lid of the Roman period. The lid is lozenge-shaped with a single pierced hinge-lug at the top corner and rounded knops on the remaining three. The two side knops are notched on the underside as in the first of the two Hattatt examples referenced below. The upper surface of the lid is decorated with twenty-five lozenge-shaped cells arranged in a five x five grid pattern, the cells originally held enamel in alternating, contrasting colours. Remnants of enamel in an undetermined colour survive in some of the cells.
Category: Roman, Seal boxes
Category: Seal boxes
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Seal Box https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/roman/seal-boxes/seal-box-54342.html Mon, 25 Mar 2019 20:53:24 GMT Seal boxes Seal Box  
Description: A complete copper-alloy seal box of the Roman period. The body of the box is circular, it has a hinge at one end, a rounded protrusion diametrically opposed, and three apertures in the base. The lid is decorated with a separately moulded phallus which is probably secured by a single rivet, the end of the phallus has annular decoration with a central cell which contains remnants of red enamel. A substantial amount of the original tinning survives on the surface of the lid.
Category: Roman, Seal boxes
Category: Seal boxes
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Seal Box Lid https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/roman/seal-boxes/seal-box-lid-2118.html Sat, 04 Feb 2006 00:00:00 GMT Seal boxes Seal Box Lid  
Description: Incomplete copper alloy Roman seal-box lid. The lid is flat, piriform in shape and has a hinge lug at one end, a separately moulded and stylised phallus is riveted to its face. The phallus moulding contains a small inset which once held enamel, the enamel no longer remaining. The sides of the lid are raised slightly creating a recess between face edge and centre moulding. Although degraded, much of the blue enamelling set within the recess is still retained. The reverse is flat except for the protruding rivet. Approximately one quarter of the lid has broken away at the location spike end leaving a surviving length of 26.75mm.

Roman seal boxes are commonly found in Britain and were used for ensuring packages reached their intended recipient without any unauthorised opening or tampering. The seal box base would be placed on the package and after securing with a cord, a knot was tied and stamped with a wax seal, the knot would be located inside the seal box and closed thus protecting the seal. Most seal boxes display cut out notches either side of one or both compartments allowing the cord to be passed through and the box closed. A location spike fitted into place on a corresponding recess on the seal box bottom helping to ensure it would not be dislodged in transit. Commonly, seal boxes were thought to be in use during the first and second centuries although it is possible they were in use later.

A similar example to the one illustrated above can be found in Richard Hattatt’s ‘Ancient Brooches And Other Artefacts’ number 157.
Category: Roman, Seal boxes
Category: Seal boxes
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Seal Box Lid https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/roman/seal-boxes/seal-box-lid-2974.html Wed, 12 Apr 2006 00:00:00 GMT Seal boxes Seal Box Lid  
Description: A complete copper-alloy seal box lid of the Roman period. The lid is lozenge-shaped with a knop on three corners, and a hinge-lug on the fourth. The top is elaborately decorated with a lozenge-ended cross over a central circle. The design is recessed for enamel, but only a trace (blue) remains in one lozenge-shaped cell adjacent to the hinge. The hinge-lug has an additional hole, possibly for threading on to a cord for safe keeping when not in use.
Category: Roman, Seal boxes
Category: Seal boxes
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Seal Box https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/roman/seal-boxes/seal-box-457.html Sun, 11 Sep 2005 00:00:00 GMT Seal boxes Seal Box  
Description: A complete Roman piriform seal box, the lid having a large roundel and a smaller triangular inset field. Both are missing the enamel with which they would originally have been decorated. The base has a slot in both edges for the passage of a cord and 3 holes underneath for attachment to the item being sealed. The lid and base are separate as the iron pin joining the two via the hinge has corroded away.
Category: Roman, Seal boxes
Category: Seal boxes
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Seal-Box Lid https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/roman/seal-boxes/seal-box-lid-42937.html Tue, 24 Sep 2013 00:00:00 GMT Seal boxes Seal-Box Lid  
Description: An elaborate enamelled seal-box lid of the Roman period. The face is decorated with an openwork sexfoil flower design to the centre, with a concentric annular recessed frame around. The recess is infilled with millefiori enamel of dark blue and white. On the lipped underside of the lid is a single hinge lug at one end, and opposite, a rounded projection containing a small housing peg to locate the lid with the seal box base.

The openwork centre could be complete in a way that the seal could be viewed within, or alternatively, may have once incorporated a delicate lattice-work feature completing the flower design. The lid is very unusual in comparison to seal box types found in this country, suggesting that it may have been manufactured on the continent.

The UKDFD would like to thank Dr Colin Andrews, Lecturer in Classical Studies at The Open University, for his help in the identification and dating of this artefact.
Category: Roman, Seal boxes
Category: Seal boxes
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Seal-Box ? https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/roman/seal-boxes/seal-box-54053.html Wed, 28 Nov 2018 12:34:39 GMT Seal boxes Seal-Box ?  
Description: An enamelled base or lid, possibly from an unusual seal box dating to the Roman period. The object is circular with a recessed back, the face being decorated with champlevé enamel. The central design is an expanded cross, with each arm terminating in a florid trefoil. At the centre of each arm is a star-shaped cell, and the four cells created between each arm are petal-shaped. Much of the red enamelling survives to each cell including those around the periphery. At one end there are two broken and distorted lugs with an integral small bar between. When complete they would have formed two open circular lugs. Opposite the pair of lugs is an extended flat projection with an incomplete small hole located at the terminal end. 

For standard seal-boxes in general, a pair of hinge lugs are located on the plain base element, as; UKDFD 457. An unusual artefact of similar construction is recorded as CORN-11F87E, on the PAS database. At one end, there are two open circular lugs on the base part, designed for the singular lug of the top part to slot between them when closed. Both parts actually hinge on a small rivet-like peg half way along the unusually long ‘neck’ or base projection. This would imply that the circular lugs were employed for securing, rather than being the hinge element. It seems likely that the above artefact is the same type of object as the PAS example, but no further parallel has yet been traced to confirm.
 
Category: Roman, Seal boxes
Category: Seal boxes
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Seal-Box Lid https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/roman/seal-boxes/seal-box-lid-13888.html Thu, 12 Jun 2008 00:00:00 GMT Seal boxes Seal-Box Lid  
Description: A fragment (60 percent) of an enamelled circular seal-box lid of the Roman period. It has three separate areas for enamel, formed in turn by a heart shape in the centre, surrounded by two concentric bands with raised edges. Red enamel survives in the centre and a trace of blue in the innermost concentric band.
Category: Roman, Seal boxes
Category: Seal boxes
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Seal-Box Lid https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/roman/seal-boxes/seal-box-lid-21574.html Fri, 16 Oct 2009 00:00:00 GMT Seal boxes Seal-Box Lid  
Description: An enamelled circular seal-box lid of the Roman period. The upper surface has moulded decoration, consisting of a central heart-shaped pendant 'suspended' from a partial circle with pellet terminals, all within a plain circular border. The centre of the heart forms an enamel cell, which was filled with orange enamel, much of which survives. A second enamel cell is formed by the space between the heart and the circular border. This contained red enamel, of which only traces remain. The underside of the lid is plain. The hinge-lug, originally located immediately above the heart motif, is missing.
Category: Roman, Seal boxes
Category: Seal boxes
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Seal Box Lid https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/roman/seal-boxes/seal-box-lid-1286.html Sun, 20 Nov 2005 00:00:00 GMT Seal boxes Seal Box Lid  
Description: Copper alloy and enamelled seal box lid of Roman date.

Cover only of a lozenge shaped, two piece seal box. Raised rim on all four outer edges with circular central recess surrounded by a single enamelled channel, within which traces of orange enamelling still remain. Remnants of the original pin are still evident within the pierced hinge located at the lid top, a small terminal lug containing the location spike is situated directly opposite. There is no cut out for the cord apparent on this particular lid.

Roman seal boxes are commonly found in Britain and were used for ensuring packages reached their intended recipient without any unauthorised opening or tampering. The seal box base would be placed on the package and after securing with a cord, a knot was tied and stamped with a wax seal, the knot would be located inside the seal box and closed thus protecting the seal. Most seal boxes display cut out notches either side of one or both compartments allowing the cord to be passed through and the box closed. A location spike, as illustrated on the above example fitted into place on a corresponding recess on the seal box bottom helping to ensure it would not be dislodged in transit. Commonly, seal boxes were thought to be in use during the first and second centuries although it is possible they were in use later.
Category: Roman, Seal boxes
Category: Seal boxes
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