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https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/templates/general_wide/img/logo.png UKDFD Recording Software https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/ Miscellaneous https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/iron-age/miscellaneous.html Arrowhead or Spearhead https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/iron-age/miscellaneous/arrowhead-or-spearhead-56100.html Mon, 24 May 2021 14:35:08 GMT Miscellaneous Arrowhead or Spearhead  
Description: An incomplete socketed arrowhead, or possibly a small spearhead tentatively dated to the Iron Age or Roman period. The solid lanceolate leaf-shaped blade has a central longitudinal mid-rib, giving a lozengiform cross-section. The tip is missing, and the socketed attachment end is broken a short distance below the base of the blade.

Note on dating. The size of the blade is consistent with some arrowheads, but its weight could also suggest its employment as a lightweight throwing spear. The overall shape of the blade is not consistent with Bronze Age examples, and after this period, iron was predominantly chosen due to increased ore availability. Bronze socketed spearheads of similar blade size and form however, although very scarce, are documented as being used during the Roman occupation period. The incompleteness of the socketed end does unfortunately cause further difficulties in finding comparisons. For this reason, a broad and tentative date range has been given.
Category: Iron Age, Miscellaneous
Category: Miscellaneous
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Pin https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/iron-age/miscellaneous/pin-56066.html Wed, 05 May 2021 11:23:18 GMT Miscellaneous Pin  
Description: An incomplete cruciform-headed copper-alloy dress pin of the Middle Iron Age. The head of the pin is moulded in the form of a globular bead with four lateral sub-oval knops located at the cardinal points around its circumference. Below the head, and separated from it by a plain waisted section, there is another bead moulding of similar size, but without appendages. Projecting below the lower bead, a short length of the circular-section shaft survives. It is bent through approximately 90 degrees, but broken on the curve. 

Cf. PAS: YORYM-4FB742WMID-791C77SWYOR-37CFEA and NARC-BF08EF.
For a stylistically comparable brooch, see UKDFD 4413.
Category: Iron Age, Miscellaneous
Category: Miscellaneous
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Razor https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/iron-age/miscellaneous/razor-55981.html Sat, 03 Apr 2021 12:49:40 GMT Miscellaneous Razor  
Description: An incomplete cast copper-allloy cutting tool (razor) of 'Hallstatt Style' dating to the Early Iron Age period. The blade is generally trapezoidal in plan, with an incurved top edge that has a small loop formed to each end. The 'blade' element is decorated on both sides with five indented triangles. The cutting edge has sustained some damage and loss. The blade tapers in cross-sectional thickness and overall has a rich blue patina.

See also; CORN-D78C78LANCUM-DB7650 & BUC-58FFF8 as similar, but all with perforted triangles rather than indented.
Category: Iron Age, Miscellaneous
Category: Miscellaneous
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Bovine Vessel Mount https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/iron-age/miscellaneous/bovine-vessel-mount-55287.html Tue, 05 May 2020 17:17:32 GMT Miscellaneous Bovine Vessel Mount  
Description: A cast copper-alloy mount in the form of a three-dimensional bull's head. The head of the mount has a curved underside, designed to sit over the rim of a vessel. The attachment plate has broken away from the base part, which would have originally extended downwards and have been fastened (with either a separate or integral rivet) to the side of the vessel (see UKDFD 19125). The features of the head are fairly well defined, with a prominent ridge to the top of the head, embellished with linear grooving. The eyes are round and sunken and the long snout widens to a flat front. The tips of each horn are now missing. Unusually, the head has a piercing in the neck of the mount, from which the vessel was either suspended, or a handle attached. Mounts for attaching handles were secured in pairs, one to each side of a vessel rim. Suspension, however, would require three or more mounts for stability whilst hanging. A typical form for handle attachment found on similar vessel mounts generally incorporate an integral in-line loop located at the top of the head (see UKDFD 33419). A hole situated transversely, as on this recorded example, would seem to lend itself for suspension more effectively, although no other mount with this method of piercing has been traced to date. A similar mount with curved underside is recorded in the below reference material, and is described as being attached to a wooden vessel (bucket).
Category: Iron Age, Miscellaneous
Category: Miscellaneous
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Anthropomorphic Mount https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/iron-age/miscellaneous/anthropomorphic-mount-11513.html Thu, 24 Jan 2008 00:00:00 GMT Miscellaneous Anthropomorphic Mount  
Description: A small copper-alloy anthropomorphic mount. The mount is in the form of a human head with typical celtic facial features, comprising braided hair; round eyes; triangular nose and an incised mouth. There is a substantial; circular mounting device on the back of the head.
Category: Iron Age, Miscellaneous
Category: Miscellaneous
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Vessel Mount https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/iron-age/miscellaneous/vessel-mount-36256.html Wed, 22 Feb 2012 00:00:00 GMT Miscellaneous Vessel Mount  
Description: A late Iron Age copper-alloy decorative mount, possibly from the rim of a wooden tankard. The mount is semi-cylindrical with a flat sub-rectangular attachment plate extending from the centre of one side. The attachment plate has a flared terminal with a central rivet hole, now vacant. The semi-cylindrical section has incised curvelinear decoration, bordered at either end by a moulded transverse collar.

Several mounts of similar form (without the attachment plate) are recorded on the PAS database, see PAS: DENO-220EF6 for related examples and discussion on their possible function.
Category: Iron Age, Miscellaneous
Category: Miscellaneous
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Gold Ingot (Fragment) https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/iron-age/miscellaneous/gold-ingot-fragment-38587.html Mon, 10 Sep 2012 00:00:00 GMT Miscellaneous Gold Ingot (Fragment)  
Description: A fragment of a D-section rectangular shaped hacked gold ingot believed to be from the Iron Age.
Category: Iron Age, Miscellaneous
Category: Miscellaneous
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Horn Cap https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/iron-age/miscellaneous/horn-cap-43819.html Sun, 24 Nov 2013 00:00:00 GMT Miscellaneous Horn Cap  
Description: An 'enigmatic' Late Iron Age artifact generally referred to as a 'Horn Cap'. Comprising two copper-alloy discs, both with central apertures. The larger disc has circumferential flanges on both surfaces, the smaller disc is flanged around the central aperture. The waisted; bobbin-like column which connects the two discs is missing. The function of horn caps remains undetermined.
Category: Iron Age, Miscellaneous
Category: Miscellaneous
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Ring https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/iron-age/miscellaneous/ring-44679.html Fri, 28 Feb 2014 00:00:00 GMT Miscellaneous Ring  
Description: A cast copper-alloy ring of probable Iron Age date. The ring is circular and D-shaped in cross section. The internal surface is smooth and plain, the exterior surface is decorated with six incised circumferential grooves between seven raised ribs. There are opposing areas of wear on both outer edges of the ring.
Category: Iron Age, Miscellaneous
Category: Miscellaneous
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Zoomorphic Terminal https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/iron-age/miscellaneous/zoomorphic-terminal-4199.html Mon, 28 Aug 2006 00:00:00 GMT Miscellaneous Zoomorphic Terminal  
Description: A zoomorphic terminal, the top of which is in the form of a typical Celtic stylised bull's head with incurved horns. Below the bull's head, the body of the terminal is of generally cylindrical form, but has a ridge along the full length of the back from which four (two are incomplete) in-line, upturned hooks project. The body is decorated with closely spaced circumferential ribs, bounded by an incised triangular border, the apex of which is at the front top centre. There is a beaded collar in sunken relief between the top of the body and the bull's head, and an incised arc below on each side of the body. Ferrous corrosion stains on the bottom and lower part of the body indicate that it was fitted to an iron stem, and remnants of this probably survive internally.

The form of the terminal is not unlike those that occur on certain Celtic fire dogs, but all the recorded examples would appear to be entirely of iron. The specific application of the present terminal is therefore uncertain.
Category: Iron Age, Miscellaneous
Category: Miscellaneous
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