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https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/templates/general_wide/img/logo.png UKDFD Recording Software https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/ Bronze Age https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/bronze-age.html Dagger/Rapier https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/bronze-age/daggers-knives-rapiers-and-swords/dagger-rapier-54442.html Wed, 15 May 2019 20:48:23 GMT Daggers, knives, rapiers and swords Dagger/Rapier  
Description: A copper-alloy dagger or rapier of the early Bronze Age period. Comprising a flat sub-triangular blade with a rounded butt and rectangular profile, the tip is missing. Hand tooled decoration consisting of multiple rows of punched dots in a zigzag pattern has been applied to both sides of the blade, much of which is still visible in the remaining patina.
Category: Bronze Age, Daggers, knives, rapiers and swords
Category: Daggers, knives, rapiers and swords
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Dirk/Dagger https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/bronze-age/daggers-knives-rapiers-and-swords/dirk-dagger-42513.html Sun, 01 Sep 2013 00:00:00 GMT Daggers, knives, rapiers and swords Dirk/Dagger  
Description: The upper section of a Middle to Late Bronze Age Penard Phase dirk or dagger. The flared butt has two rivet holes for hafting the wood or bone handle. The blade (broken in antiquity) is tapered with a flat rib on each side, defined by a bevelled edge.
Category: Bronze Age, Daggers, knives, rapiers and swords
Category: Daggers, knives, rapiers and swords
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Awl https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/bronze-age/awls/awl-968.html Tue, 25 Oct 2005 00:00:00 GMT Awls Awl  
Description: A complete copper or bronze awl of probably Bronze Age date. A small pointed awl with a square section tang; a type that was fitted with a simple wooden handle.

Awls and tracers of pure copper are found in Beaker graves of the early Bronze Age (see Upton Lovell, Wiltshire) and awls of bronze continue to be used throughout the Bronze Age. It is impossible to closely date an object type that varies little in form over such large periods of time, if found in topsoil.
Category: Bronze Age, Awls
Category: Awls
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Awl https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/bronze-age/awls/awl-1905.html Mon, 16 Jan 2006 00:00:00 GMT Awls Awl  
Description: Complete copper alloy Bronze Age awl. Square shank, both ends tapering to a point.

These are found in context throughout the whole of the Bronze Age period, sometimes turning up in burials and hoards. When found out of context however, close dating to any specific period proves difficult.
Category: Bronze Age, Awls
Category: Awls
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Awl https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/bronze-age/awls/awl-5160.html Wed, 15 Nov 2006 00:00:00 GMT Awls Awl  
Description: A copper-alloy awl of the Bronze Age. The awl is rectangular in section, with one half of the length tapering to a point, and the other half to a rounded 'chisel edge'. The corners of the awl have a series of small notches along their length, which, by their uniformity and spacing, appear to be deliberate.

Awls of this type have been found in contexts from the Early to Late Bronze Age, but those recovered from topsoil cannot be closely dated within this period.
Category: Bronze Age, Awls
Category: Awls
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Awl https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/bronze-age/awls/awl-5407.html Fri, 15 Dec 2006 00:00:00 GMT Awls Awl  
Description: Complete copper alloy Bronze Age awl. Square shank, both ends tapering to a point.

These are found in context throughout the whole of the Bronze Age period, sometimes turning up in burials and hoards. When found out of context however, close dating to any specific period proves difficult.

It's been suggested that these awls may in fact not be awls at all, but BA retoucheurs - tools used for the pressure flaking of lithics that mimic the form of the antler picks widely used during the Neolithic/BA period. There may be some merit to the theory - modern knappers often use copper rods (with wooden or bone handles) to pressure flake flint - it 'grips' the stone nicely and is generally more durable and user-friendly than either antler or bone. It may indeed be no coincidence that they are often found associated with the presence of very fine lithic tools within burials.

More research will be required to test the theory - particularly as to the chemical composition of the awls: bronze (at 90/10% Cu/Sn) is a far harder material than pure copper and may prove to be less suitable for pressure flaking (harder metals 'skate' across the surface of the rock too easily). Microscopic analysis of the associated lithics may provide evidence of trace amounts of copper/bronze remaining on the surface of the rock that might go some way in reinforcing the theory.
Category: Bronze Age, Awls
Category: Awls
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Awl https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/bronze-age/awls/awl-12414.html Tue, 11 Mar 2008 00:00:00 GMT Awls Awl  
Description: A copper-alloy awl, circular in section, with one pointed end, and the other with a flattened and rounded 'chisel edge'.

Awls of generally similar type have been found in contexts from the Middle Bronze Age, but some are believed to be much later. Those recovered from topsoil cannot be closely dated, but the very similar example cited in the reference below is dated to the 1st century BC.
Category: Bronze Age, Awls
Category: Awls
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Awl https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/bronze-age/awls/awl-14404.html Sat, 26 Jul 2008 00:00:00 GMT Awls Awl  
Description: A copper-alloy awl. It is of rectangular cross-section at the centre, with one end becoming progressively circular in section and tapering to a point, and the other end tapering to a 'chisel edge'.

Awls of generally similar type have been found in contexts from the Middle Bronze Age, but some are believed to be much later (see refs. below). Those recovered from topsoil cannot be closely dated.
Category: Bronze Age, Awls
Category: Awls
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Copper-Alloy Awl https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/bronze-age/awls/copper-alloy-awl-14675.html Wed, 13 Aug 2008 00:00:00 GMT Awls Copper-Alloy Awl  
Description: An awl of copper-alloy. It is narrow and sub-triangular in plan, with a sub-square section. The distal end tapers to a sharp point, while the proximal flares to a 'chisel edge'.

Awls of generally similar type have been found in contexts from the Middle Bronze Age, but some are believed to be much later (see refs. below). Those recovered from topsoil cannot be closely dated.
Category: Bronze Age, Awls
Category: Awls
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Copper-Alloy Awl https://www.ukdfd.co.uk/v46/artefact/bronze-age/awls/copper-alloy-awl-15508.html Wed, 24 Sep 2008 00:00:00 GMT Awls Copper-Alloy Awl  
Description: A complete copper-alloy awl, probably dating to the Bronze Age. Rod-like in plan, with a sub-circular section, tapering to a point at one end and flattened at the other.

These awls are found in context throughout the whole of the Bronze Age period, sometimes turning up in Beaker burials and hoards. When found out of context however, close dating to any specific period proves difficult.

It's been suggested that these awls may in fact not be awls at all, but BA retoucheurs - tools used for the pressure flaking of lithics that mimic the form of the antler picks widely used during the Neolithic/BA period. There may be some merit to the theory - modern knappers often use copper rods (with wooden or bone handles) to pressure flake flint - it 'grips' the stone nicely and is generally more durable and user-friendly than either antler or bone. It may indeed be no coincidence that they are often found associated with the presence of very fine lithic tools within burials.

It would be possible to haft either end by hammering the awl into a wood/bone handle. The blunted end could then be hammered back into the desired shape. The flat portion of such a retoucher is used by modern knappers to cut precise notches in tertiary flake bifaces to produce tanged and barbed arrowheads that are associated with Beaker Culture.

More research will be required to test the theory - particularly as to the chemical composition of the awls: bronze (at 90/10% Cu/Sn) is a far harder material than pure copper and may prove to be less suitable for pressure flaking (harder metals 'skate' across the surface of the rock too easily). Microscopic analysis of the associated lithics may provide evidence of trace amounts of copper/bronze remaining on the surface of the rock that might go some way in reinforcing the theory.
Category: Bronze Age, Awls
Category: Awls
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